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Pelvic Health

Working with your physician, our certified therapist can help diagnose and develop a treatment plan for pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD).
The “pelvic floor” refers to a group of muscles that attach to the front, back, and sides of the pelvic bone and sacrum (the large fused bone at the bottom of the spine, just above the tailbone). Like a sling or hammock, these muscles support the organs in the pelvis, including the bladder, uterus or prostate, and colon. They also wrap around the urethra, rectum, and vagina.
Coordinated contracting and relaxing of these muscles controls bowel and bladder functions—the pelvic floor must relax to allow for urination, bowel movements, and sexual intercourse.

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction may include:

  • Urinary urgency, frequency, hesitancy, stopping and starting of urine stream, painful urination, or incomplete emptying
  • Genital organ prolapse
  • Constipation, or fecal incontinence
  • Unexplained pain in the low back, pelvic region, genital area, or rectum
  • Pain during or after intercourse, orgasm, or sexual stimulation
  • Uncoordinated muscle contractions causing the pelvic floor muscles to spasm
  • Pregnancy-related low back and pelvic pain

Treatment usually combines self-care, medicines, physical therapy, and home exercise.